Biography
    Biography



    John Sizemore started studying the tuba in the seventh grade at D.R. Hill Middle School, in Duncan, SC.  The
    following year he was awarded a scholarship for private lessons with Dr. Roger McDuffie,
    at Converse College.  The same year he was awarded a scholarship for the first of eight summers that
    he would spend at the Brevard Music Center.  At the age of 16, he auditioned and was appointed
    principal tuba in the Spartanburg Symphony Orchestra by Dr. Henry Janiec. Two years later, he auditioned for
    Maestro Jacques Brourman and was appointed principal tuba in the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra.

    After his graduation from James F. Byrnes High School, he was invited by the renowned composer, Dr. Vittorio Gianinni, to attend the newly
    formed North Carolina School of the Arts on a full music scholarship.  This was followed by appointments as principal tuba in the Greensboro
    Symphony and the Winston-Salem Symphony, as well as principal tuba in Siena, Italy at the famed Accademia Musicale Chigiana, under the
    direction of Maestro Piero Bellugi.     

    His studies with Dr. John Marcellus at the North Carolina School of the Arts led to visits to Chicago for studies with the
    legendary teacher and principal tuba of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Arnold Jacobs.  Upon his competition of the Bachelor of Music
    degree from the North Carolina School of the Arts, John Sizemore received a scholarship for study
    with Mr. Jacobs through the Civic Orchestra of Chicago.  This led to a move to Chicago and a relationship with Mr. Jacobs
    that continued until his death in 1998.  As with many others who studied with Mr. Jacobs, he became not only a mentor, but
    a close friend and role model.  Mr. Jacobs always set the highest possible standards as a teacher, performer, spiritual
    leader, and human being.       

    While in Chicago, John Sizemore also worked closely with Jay Friedman, principal trombonist of the Chicago Symphony, and studied
    conducting with Margaret Hillis, director of the Chicago Symphony Chorus and Associate Conductor of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago.  His
    studies with Ms. Hillis led to an appointment as assistant conductor of the Elgin Symphony
    Orchestra and professor of brass and chamber music at Elgin University.  

    He then returned to the North Carolina School of the Arts as Artist-in-Residence for the University System of North Carolina
    and as a founding member of the Piedmont Brass Quintet.  The Piedmont Brass Quintet toured throughout the United States
    and Europe.  Their featured concert at the New York Brass Symposium led to a command repeat performance and
    broadcasts over National Public Radio.  

    John Sizemore was then appointed principal tuba for the Spoleto Music Festival held in Spoleto, Italy. His work there
    was praised by Thomas Shippers, Principal conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and Music director of the Cincinnati
    Symphony; Christopher Keene, Artistic Director of the New York City Opera;  and Gian Carlo Menotti, the great Italian born composer.

    In 1990, he joined the Southwest Brass Quintet for tours of the United States and Mexico.  The following year he returned
    to his home in South Carolina and was appointed principal tuba of the Asheville Symphony and adjunct teacher of tuba, euphonium, and brass
    chamber music at Western Carolina University.  

    He also began working with Mr. Phil McIntyre and the band program at James F. Byrnes High School.  His appointment as coordinator of
    private instruction for the District Five Bands has contributed to the continued success of an already great
    band program.  

    In addition to District Five Bands, John Sizemore currently holds positions at North Greenville University and the South
    Carolina Governor’s School for Arts and Humanities.    

    John Sizemore is one of the most sought after teachers in South Carolina.  Students and young professionals, from many
    states, travel regularly to his studio for lessons.  His former students are now performing and teaching in universities, high schools and middle
    schools throughout the United States